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Curriculum

CNCC’s philosophy is carried out through an approach to curriculum called Emergent Curriculum.  This type of curriculum is developed through the children’s interests, the world around them and unexpected events. Young children are active learners learning best through their play.  Planning for this curriculum involves allowing both the adults and the children to have initiative and decision making power in what types of activities and projects they will be doing.  The teachers will still have planned activities for the children to do, but will also allow for the plans to change and diverge as the children’s interests change.
 
CNCC’s curriculum also includes:  
  • Developmentally Appropriate Practice:  Projects and activities are both age appropriate as well as individually appropriate for each child’s developmental level.  Teachers will provide opportunities for the children to explore and create that are consistent with their age and their development.   
     
  • Different Learning Styles:  We believe that it is important to understand that children learn in different ways.  Some children learn best through active physical learning, others musically, some through use of language, manipulating and creating objects, in groups, or by themselves. Our teachers will offer the children many different opportunities to build their knowledge, basing projects and activities on the theory of multiple learning styles and the teacher’s observations of the children.

  • Non-bias curriculum: We strive to create a program that truly reflects the lives of our children, families, staff and community.  By recognizing the impact culture plays on families, we will make every effort to provide culturally responsive child care by affirming human differences and the right of people to make choices about their own lifestyle.  We seek to recognize, appreciate and respect the uniqueness of each child and be accepting of all families.
 


   “Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children play is serious learning.
   Play is really the work of childhood.”  Fred Rogers